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Low-carb diets help control type 2 diabetes better


A low carbohydrate diet saves some patients from taking medication
Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the hormone insulin is less effective. The result is increased blood sugar levels. Researchers have now found that a diet without lots of carbohydrates helps people to keep their disease under better control. Some sufferers even no longer need medication to regulate their blood sugar.

Scientists found in an investigation that people who gave up a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet found that their blood sugar level dropped 10 weeks later. For this reason, doctors think that low-carb diets could be a reliable way to better control type 2 diabetes in the future. The researchers will publish the results of their study at the so-called European Obesity Summit in Sweden.

Regular checkups in children with diabetes are particularly important
A review of more than 80,000 people who gave up a low-fat and high-carb diet has now shown that this change in diet lowered blood sugar levels after about ten weeks, the Telegraph reports. This makes it much easier to control such a disease. About 75 percent of older children with diabetes do not receive tests to keep their disease under control. These examinations include, for example, eye examinations and foot examinations as well as measurements of growth, blood pressure, kidney functions and cholesterol. If children are not supported in the management of their disease in early life, the risk of life-threatening complications increases, warn the scientists, according to the Telegraph.

Advantages of a low-carb diet
The study participants had participated in an investigation in which they followed a so-called low-carb eating plan. With this type of diet, the subjects tried to consume foods that were low in starch. For this, they ate a lot of protein and healthy saturated fats, such as olive oil and nuts, the authors explain to the Telegraph. More than 80 percent of all subjects stated that they had lost at least ten percent of their weight through this type of diet. More than 70 percent of participants experienced improvements in blood sugar after ten weeks of changing their diet, and a fifth said that they no longer need medication to regulate their blood sugar.

Official nutrition guidelines should be revised urgently
Some doctors are now pushing for an overhaul of the current dietary guidelines. The new study has provided clear evidence of the positive effects of a low-carbohydrate diet, the experts say. So far, most patients have followed diet plans that do not support a low-carb diet. Public Health England (PHE) and Diabetes UK still rate this, the doctors explain. Sufferers followed these plans and tried to lose weight. The blood sugar remained high, however, so the sufferers had to resort to medication, the authors added to the Telegraph.

In the UK alone, over 2.7 million people have type 2 diabetes
In the UK alone, over 2.7 million people suffer from type 2 diabetes. This condition is closely related to obesity. Around 750,000 people are believed to have symptoms of the disease that have not yet been diagnosed, the experts report. A change in diet could likely help many of the people affected to cope better with their condition and control their blood sugar more easily. (as)

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Video: American Diabetes Association cautiously endorses low carb (January 2022).